(Source: brokenheads)

vuls: Blow 
Jonathan De Pas, DonatoD’Urbino, Paolo Lomazzi, Carla Scolari

vulsBlow 

Jonathan De Pas, Donato
D’Urbino, Paolo Lomazzi, Carla Scolari

(via vuls)

youmightfindyourself: Panzerschreck: The Germans captured an American Bazooka during World War II, and reverse engineered it to create the larger Panzerschreck.

youmightfindyourselfPanzerschreck: The Germans captured an American Bazooka during World War II, and reverse engineered it to create the larger Panzerschreck.

James Jean

James Jean

my music

(via cellulist)

thingsandschemes: - Nernard de Wolff

thingsandschemes: - Nernard de Wolff

(via u1u11)

vuls: The Wizard of Op by Ed Emberley

vulsThe Wizard of Op by Ed Emberley

(via vuls)

itwonlast: A sculpture by Constantin Brancusi at the Kunsthaus Museum, Zurich, 1955
René Burri 1955

itwonlastA sculpture by Constantin Brancusi at the Kunsthaus Museum, Zurich, 1955

René Burri
1955

itwonlastWhen men have died they enter history. When statues have died they enter art. This botany of death is what we call culture.”

Statues Also Die (Chris Marker, Alain Resnais, 1953, 30min)

Commissioned by the pan-African quarterly Présence Africaine, Statues Also Die marked Chris Marker’s first foray into the essay film genre. After its first screening at the 1953 Cannes Film Festival, and in spite of winning the Prix Jean Vigo in 1954, Statues Also Die was banned in France by the Centre National de la Cinématographie for its controversial anti-colonialist stance. While a truncated version was made available in 1963, the unabridged film only became available in 1968 and would not be widely seen until decades later.

As comprehensive analysis of the institutional mechanisms of museologics, Statues Also Die prime contention is, in effect, that anthropology and ethnology have their Schroedinger’s Cat; that the removal of an object from its spiritual context-in-community, it’s enslavement and caging in the museum and it’s sacrifice to the white deity of Art, cannot but change it’s state. The black cat, once its museum-box is opened, is always found dead. Astoundingly, in what is only his second film, Marker starts with a cogent and prescient discourse, a formulation of race politics before the days of the civil rights movement, before the rise of post-colonial “third world” studies, and well before semiology and cultural studies established themselves as recognised academic disciplines. (via)

itwonlast: Still Life
Giorgio MorandiOil on canvas, 1957

itwonlastStill Life

Giorgio Morandi
Oil on canvas, 1957

lehroi: Pipilotti Rist
Installation view, Wexner Center for the Arts, ‘The Tender Room’, Columbus OH, 2011.

lehroiPipilotti Rist

Installation view, Wexner Center for the Arts, ‘The Tender Room’, Columbus OH, 2011.

(Source: jemeos, via unisect)

itwonlast: Nature Morte
 Youcef Korichi Oil on canvas, 2011

itwonlastNature Morte

Youcef Korichi
Oil on canvas, 2011

itwonlast: The Spring 2012 issue of Berlin-based magazine mono.kultur :  #31 - Michaël Borremans: Shades of Doubt featuring 20 life-size printed detail plates of Borremans’ paintings

White Light Shadows: Circles, Squares, Triangles :: Taree Mackenzie

(Source: mister-nobody)

vroomheid: Comme des garçons, 1988
“Of course there are business as well as creative reasons for the Comme des Garçons style. The point of a remarkable interior is to evoke such a strong sense of identity that even the most humble purchase - a belt or a pair of socks - brings with it some of that underlying identity. The contrast between the textures of the garments, hanging on neatly spaced racks that read like sculptural elements and the cement wall is all part of the establishment of the uniqueness of the Comme des Garçons label. To put too many garments on display can diminish their impact, hence the company’s first Paris shop had on show less than half the stock a conventional high-fashion retailer would have installed. In environments with so few distractions, the customer can hardly fail to be aware of the subtle qualities of the clothes.”
from rei kawakubo and comme des garçons

vroomheid: Comme des garçons, 1988

“Of course there are business as well as creative reasons for the Comme des Garçons style. The point of a remarkable interior is to evoke such a strong sense of identity that even the most humble purchase - a belt or a pair of socks - brings with it some of that underlying identity. The contrast between the textures of the garments, hanging on neatly spaced racks that read like sculptural elements and the cement wall is all part of the establishment of the uniqueness of the Comme des Garçons label. To put too many garments on display can diminish their impact, hence the company’s first Paris shop had on show less than half the stock a conventional high-fashion retailer would have installed. In environments with so few distractions, the customer can hardly fail to be aware of the subtle qualities of the clothes.”

from rei kawakubo and comme des garçons

(via deptth)

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