prohappy: the sanitation twins on recycling // portlandia s2/e8

(via iamnomes)

wetheurban: ART: “Waiting” by Addie Wagenknecht
Everything is faster. Loading, booting (and rebooting). Tension manifested by a wheel. False promises of completion hang within the promise of a completion.
Waiting is a meditation on the interface of networked culture and the insubstantial nature of waiting.
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wetheurbanART: “Waiting” by Addie Wagenknecht

Everything is faster. Loading, booting (and rebooting). Tension manifested by a wheel. False promises of completion hang within the promise of a completion.

Waiting is a meditation on the interface of networked culture and the insubstantial nature of waiting.

Read More

(via fuks)

a house is not a home without internet

youmightfindyourself: Which black train to take is matter of guesswork. They have no destination signs and no announcement of arrivals is made. Head car may be numbered to show its route, but number is often wrong. In confusion, passengers sometimes jump across track, and some are killed by express trains.
South African documentary photographer Ernest Cole critically subverts the operations of the archive. Cole has the ability to officially change his racial status from black to colored, due to ambiguities in the government’s methods of documenting and systematizing racial identification, in order to gain access to broader strata of society for his photographic project. Cole’s black-and-white photographs depict passbook arrests, police inspections, dehumanizing conditions in the diamond mines, “white only” signage in the city—images that would have been subject to censoring.
Cole, when stopped and questioned by authorities, masqueraded his photographs as documents of youth crime rather than as records of the violence of institutional apartheid policy. In this way, Cole’s negatives passed archivally. Presenting his work in the guise of documentary visual policing, Cole was able to leave South Africa with his negatives and go to the United States, where House of Bondage was published. This operation of critical camouflaging, of archival mimicry as a critical practice in the realm of photographic production, will fuel this examination of the ways in which the body is represented archivally in contemporary photography from South Africa.
From Ernest Cole’s book, House of Bondage.

youmightfindyourselfWhich black train to take is matter of guesswork. They have no destination signs and no announcement of arrivals is made. Head car may be numbered to show its route, but number is often wrong. In confusion, passengers sometimes jump across track, and some are killed by express trains.

South African documentary photographer Ernest Cole critically subverts the operations of the archive. Cole has the ability to officially change his racial status from black to colored, due to ambiguities in the government’s methods of documenting and systematizing racial identification, in order to gain access to broader strata of society for his photographic project. Cole’s black-and-white photographs depict passbook arrests, police inspections, dehumanizing conditions in the diamond mines, “white only” signage in the city—images that would have been subject to censoring.

Cole, when stopped and questioned by authorities, masqueraded his photographs as documents of youth crime rather than as records of the violence of institutional apartheid policy. In this way, Cole’s negatives passed archivally. Presenting his work in the guise of documentary visual policing, Cole was able to leave South Africa with his negatives and go to the United States, where House of Bondage was published. This operation of critical camouflaging, of archival mimicry as a critical practice in the realm of photographic production, will fuel this examination of the ways in which the body is represented archivally in contemporary photography from South Africa.

From Ernest Cole’s book, House of Bondage.

That which has no substance enters where there is no space.

Lao Tzu (via thecalminside)

popularsizes: private eyes sunglass corporation, new york, 1983

popularsizes: private eyes sunglass corporation, new york, 1983

(via uoa)

foxesinbreeches: Yayoi Kusama with Infinity Mirrored Room - Love Forever installed for the 1966 solo exhibition Peep Show/Endless Love Show at Castellane Gallery, New York

foxesinbreechesYayoi Kusama with Infinity Mirrored Room - Love Forever installed for the 1966 solo exhibition Peep Show/Endless Love Show at Castellane Gallery, New York

(via 20aliens)

dkmacgougan: Miranda My New Friend
oil, oilstick, colored pencil, graphite, watercolor on Arches oil paper
Dave MacGougan 2014

dkmacgouganMiranda My New Friend

oil, oilstick, colored pencil, graphite, watercolor on Arches oil paper

Dave MacGougan 2014

(Source: davidmacgougan.com, via vergen)

smalljoke: by jesssicahans

smalljoke: by jesssicahans

opinions basically

(Source: cellulist)

some stickers ive been making

(Source: cellulist, via cellulist)

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